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Diabetic Eye Exams in Wilkes Barre

Detect & Manage Diabetes-Related Eye Conditions

 

Diabetes can significantly increase your chances of developing certain eye conditions and even lead to vision loss. The longer you have had diabetes, as well as whether you have Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, can also further increase your chances of developing serious, vision-threatening diseases and conditions.
Early detection is vital for diagnosing serious eye diseases and safeguarding your vision. Depending on the condition, your optometrist can help you slow or even halt vision loss.

Diabetic Retinopathy & You

 

One of the most serious conditions patients with diabetes may develop is diabetic retinopathy. This disease is caused by high blood sugar levels and hypertension, both of which are symptoms of diabetes

High blood sugar levels can damage the delicate blood vessels in the eyes, causing them to swell or leak. The damaged blood vessels may impair vision by allowing blood to leak into the vitreous (or gel-like interior) of the eye and can increase your chances of experiencing a retinal detachment.

Stages of Diabetic Retinopathy

 

Diabetic retinopathy has two stages:

  • Non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) is the early stage of diabetic retinopathy. During this stage, the blood vessels in the retina swell and leak. The retina and macula may experience swelling at this time as well.

 

  • Proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PRD) is the more advanced stage of diabetic retinopathy. New blood vessels grow to compensate for the damaged ones. However, they are incredibly fragile and prone to leaking, which can lead to vision loss. Additionally, if scar tissue begins to form, it can significantly increase your chances of experiencing a retinal detachment.

 

Symptoms of Diabetic Retinopathy

In its early stages, diabetic retinopathy rarely exhibits symptoms. The damage is so gradual it typically goes unnoticed. However, as the disease progresses, you may develop floaters, dark spots, and blurry vision. You may also have trouble seeing clearly at night. If you begin to notice any of these symptoms, please book an appointment as soon as possible.

 

One of the most serious conditions patients with diabetes may develop is diabetic retinopathy. This disease is caused by high blood sugar levels and hypertension, both of which are symptoms of diabetes
High blood sugar levels can damage the delicate blood vessels in the eyes, causing them to swell or leak. The damaged blood vessels may impair vision by allowing blood to leak into the vitreous (or gel-like interior) of the eye and can increase your chances of experiencing a retinal detachment.

Specialized Diabetic Eye Testing

 

We pride ourselves in providing thorough testing so we can help you make appropriate decisions related to your eye health. During a diabetic eye exam, we use a few different methods of testing to look for signs of eye diseases and other conditions.

Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)

 

OCT takes cross-sectional pictures of your retina using non-invasive light. This allows us to see the layers within your retina and measure their thickness. Corneal thickness measurements can be used to pinpoint signs of swelling and make inferences about your eye health.

Fundus Photography

 

Fundus photography involves taking pictures of your eyes using a specialized microscope and attached camera. Once your pupil has been dilated, the camera takes a picture of the back of your eyes (the fundus).
The photo will provide your optometrist with a clear view of your retina, blood vessels, and optic nerve, and any associated abnormalities. We’ll also be able to see drusen (fatty proteins), abnormal bleeding, or any scar tissue that could be signs of trouble.

Treatment

 

Based on your results from our assessments and subsequent diagnosis, we can monitor your eyes or begin managing or treating your condition to slow its progression. Depending on the stage you’re in, the treatment and management options available to you may vary.

 

If your diabetic retinopathy is diagnosed in its early stages, you may not require treatment. However, we will recommend you visit your endocrinologist (diabetes specialist) to learn what steps you can take to better manage your diabetes, as controlling your blood sugar can help slow the progression of diabetic retinopathy.

For advanced stages, you may need surgical treatment. We’ll discuss your options with you after examining your eyes and advise you on your next steps.

The best way to stay on top of your eye health and safeguard your vision is to schedule a regular eye exam. Simply book an appointment, and we’ll take it from there.

Book Appointment Now